Music


First making music at the end of his high school days, 23-year-old Phil Jones began Dog Bite after dropping out of the Savannah College of Art and Design. Influenced by the work of J Dilla, Portishead, Caribou, Panda Bear and The Roots, Jones began self-releasing tracks, followed-by a 7-inch and CD on Young Turks. While later touring as the keyboardist to Washed Out he picked up an acoustic guitar and composed his debut-full length, Velvet Changes, released on Carpark in early 2013. In support of Velvet Changes, Dog Bite embarked on an extensive North American winter tour with labelmate Toro Y Moi. The two marked the occasion with a split 7″. Jones returns with his newest release on Carpark, the LA EP.

In addition to his time with Washed Out, Jones has appeared on a matthewdavid release and produced for Mood Rings and Bosco. As one half of Acid Flashback, he’s crafted tunes for the voice of Karen Jacobs (of Toronto’s Free Kisses). Dog Bite performs live as a four-piece, featuring Jones’ friend Woody Shortridge formerly of defunct Atlanta band Balkans.













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There’s little doubt that Marnie Stern lives up to her reputation as “the lady who shreds,” but for Marnie, shredding is not enough. After putting out three critically-acclaimed albums, Marnie could have gotten away with putting out another album filled with her richly layered sound, singular frenetic finger tapping and almost philosophical lyrics. However, as anyone who has given her last few albums a good listen can tell, Marnie is not one to stand still. Instead she attacks her musical evolution with full frontal bravado, reveling in musical risk instead of relaxing in the comforts of the known. For Marnie, musical possibility drives her ambition.

Her new album, The Chronicles of Marnia, finds Marnie not only working with a new drummer (Oneida’s Kid Millions), but also passionately subtracting from her normally dense song structures to craft a sound that is both familiar and wholly original. “I always gravitate towards interweaving and a more abrasive sound,” Marnie said about working on the new album. “I was working with Nicholas Vernhes from Rare Book Room Recording in Brooklyn, and he was the producer. He wanted my voice clearer and fewer guitar parts. I tried it because I wanted to try something different.”

Her trademark exuberant guitar work is still present, in fact, absent a few layers of grit, it’s even more evident. “We stripped away a lot of the layers and a lot of unnecessary interweaving guitar parts. There’s less clutter and more of staying on a part without adding too much instrumentation.” Through the subtractive production process, Marnie’s voice became more prominent, a fact that kind of concerns Marnie, “I get worried that I am coming across as someone who thinks they are a ‘singer,’ as opposed to my usual mishmash of voices that aren’t always in key,” she said about the album’s more pronounced vocals. “I grapple with that attitude because I think it’s important as a musician to try and be as proficient as possible, or try to put a lot of work into it. I suppose in my own way, I put a ton of time into singing and trying to find interesting melody ideas, I just never think of myself as having a ‘nice’ voice.” It’s an enervating change for an artist who in the past has always skillfully buried her vocals under the guitar and drum tracks.

The musical transformation evident on her new album isn’t entirely unexpected, as fans who have listened to both “For Ash” and “Every Single Line Means Something” in a single sitting know. That same slow progression can be seen between 2010’s self-titled album and the forthcoming The Chronicles of Marnia. Marnie can’t help but laugh when thinking back on her musical evolution. “I’m sure if I went from the first album to this one, I’d have a heart attack. Luckily it’s been gradual enough for me to enjoy the changes.” And there’s little doubt that her fans will too. Even as Marnie evolves from what Pitchfork called her “art-metal math-rock bubblegum pop” genre, fans will still find themselves jumping head first into the album and quickly bonding with the emotionally resonant material, cascading hooks and transcendental guitar riffs. Plus, the album shreds. She is Marnie Stern after all.











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CYNE are more than one emcee, more than two producers, more than their decade-spanning discography, and, with the announcement of their new album, All My Angles Are Right, more than just hip-hop. Cise Star is a conscience for your headphones. Speck and Enoch dig deep so you don’t have to. CYNE rise above their sphere, merging the personal and the political with genre-busting production and silver-tongued rhymes that capture cross-millennia truths.

Their beats have been used by Joey Bada$$, they’ve been remixed by Four Tet, they’ve collaborated with To Rococo Rot, Daedelus, and Nujabes, and, since 2008, they’ve been on Hometapes alongside Bear In Heaven, Megafaun, Matthew E. White, and Medicine-founder Brad Laner. CYNE lights up their full spectrum with All My Angles Are Right, their fifth album out March 2014 – and with this winter’s tell-tale release of the first single “Tears For Uriah.”









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Passenger Peru is the brain child of Justin Stivers (bassist on The Antlers album “Hospice”, Pet Ghost Project) who combines his talents with virtuoso multi-instrumentalist Justin Gonzales to bring you a raw mix of cosmic shape-shifting tunes teetering on the brink of danceability.

Their debut self-titled album was written and recorded over the course of a year in Brooklyn basements and tranquil locations in the foothills of the Alaskan wilderness. The album finds the Brooklyn duo blending the tender and vulnerable song writing of Yo La Tengo with the aural colorings and production of Brian Wilson and the tribal noise freak-outs of early Animal Collective.











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The fact that punk rock could capture the imaginations of young people around Europe and America in the late ’70′s was embodied in the five-year output of Switzerland’sKleenex (later renamed Liliput). The music meant empowerment for many people to take chances and not worry about consequences. This was especially so for women like guitarist Marlene Marder and bassist Klaudia Schiff, the two constants/mainstays of the group.

When punk groups began springing up in Zurich, it was a very small scene with a handful of bands that all knew each other, not many places to play and virtually no support from radio stations or the press there. Marder(originally a saxophonist) had played with a group called the Nasal Boys. Two experimental film-makers, Schiffand drummer Lislot Ha had been bouncing around the idea of forming group before hooking up with the appropriately-named vocalist Regula Sing and a male guitarist who had much more ambitious musician plans. Marder liked what she heard from the band and was glad to step in to replace him. Indeed, the group’s aim was to have fun, more than to become rich and famous. Armed with a repertoire of four-songs and three chords, Kleenexwowed the local crowds with their simple, child-like rock ditties, filled with joyful chants and nonsense words in the tradition of Little Richard’s “Tutti Frutti” but musically more in the noisy, exuberant spirit of their British comradesthe Sex Pistols.

Kleenex had local friends who decided to start up a label (Sunrise) where the band put out their first (self-financed) EP in 1978, which included the same four songs from their live sets (“Beri-Beri,” “Ain’t You,” “Hedi’s Head,” “Nice”). The response was such that the first pressing sold out in weeks. A copy of the EP managed to get toJohn Peel, the famous English DJ, who fell in love with it and played it over and over for his radio listeners. Rough Trade got wind of their strange, wonderful music and signed the group to a record contract. Their first single (“Ain’t You” and “Hedi’s Head” from the EP) made a splash with the UK press and led the label to organize a group of dates around Europe with label-mates Scritti Politti and Red Krayola. Not even a year after their formation, the group was already an international sensation even though, at the time, they still held various clerical jobs back in Zurich.

Coming to England, they were unimaginatively dubbed the ‘Swiss Slits’ by the press and made their next single (“You”/”U”, 1979) with Krayola leader/Rough Trade producer Mayo Thompson. Soon, they were off headlining an English ‘package tourí with local favorites like the Raincoats, Swell Maps, Subway Sect and Spizz Energi.

After the tour ended in late ’79, Sing left the group to be replaced by Chrigle Freund, a recent high school dropout, much younger than the rest of the group. With the loss of their original singer and threats to destroy all their records by the tissue company, which they took their name from, the group rechristened itself as Liliput in 1980, soon adding saxist Angie Barrack to their ranks. This five-piece line up recorded their next single ‘Die Matrosen/Split’ with its famous nonsense cheers/shouts (‘Hotch-potch, Hugger-mugger, Bow-wow, Hara-kiri!’), making a splash on the UK indie/alternative charts.

Despite their success, Ha and Barrack left the group, reducing them to a trio. Their next single, 1981′s politically-motivated ‘Eisiger Wind’ (with its Hugo Ball parody sleeve) caught the attention of noted American rock criticsRobert Christgau and Greil Marcus, who praised the innovative trio. By the time the single was released, the band was in the middle of another personnel crisis with Freund now leaving the group. Marder and Schiff closed ranks and assembled a new band with singer Astrid Spirit, drummer Beat Schlatter and saxist Christoph Herzog. After a successful German tour, the later two left the band (though Schlatter continued to help on drums) and the group was a trio again.

After four years, the group finally released a full-length album (‘Liliput’) for Rough Trade in 1982, leading into another tour. After another single (‘The Jatz’/'You Did It’, 1983), Marder and Schiff were tired, not having fun anymore and ready to quit. Spirit rallied them to do another record with an advance from Rough TradeGermany. Their second album (Some Songs, which Marder thinks is some of their best work), with various guests helping out and Spirit now playing violin, turned out to be their swan song. Spirit decided that she wanted to raise a family instead of being in a band, spelling the end of the group in late ’83. Marder had her own record shop, worked at a jazz club and had a band in the late ’80′s called Danger Mice. Schiff returned to painting, which she had done for many flyers and sleeves for the band.

Ten years later, Marder (now working for the World Wildlife Federation) and the same people behind the originalKleenex releases put out the 2-CD LiLiPut retrospective on the local Off Course label, including all of the material that the band had released. Though it received rave reviews (including a ‘A’ from Christgau and a spot on his year-end top 10 list), it was soon out-of-print. Collectors were paying hundreds of dollars in auctions for this material.


(Source : killrockstars)



















Cherry Glazerr is an LA based band.
Cherry Glazerr “Haxel Princess” out on Burger Records!!! High school teeny bopper rockers debut album of super amazing pure pop gems about cats, dogs, birds, bees, grilled cheese and everything in between!!! Don’t sleep on this amazing album and band!!!














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Slime Girls is the secret shoujo chiptune life of Pedro Invader. From the wastelands of central California comes a distorted pulsewave assault of Nintendo gameboys, guitars and energetic drums. Sometimes fast, lush and loud punk rock, other times melancholy surf jams, sometimes ever danceable ska, yet always tied together with an electronic wash of melodic chip music. Alternatively: just some sorta’ loud chiptune punk anime junk.




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