Photography


Alessandro Teoldi is a New York-based artist born in Milan, Italy in 1987. His work explores the failure of translation and the perceptions of the familiar by using the kaleidoscopic possibilities of photographic technologies.

He can best describe my work as a neat accumulation of unfinished fragments.

By taking apart a photograph in multiple fragments and then rearranging them, he wants to push my viewers to do a private exercise of re-composition. How we perceive images is one of my core concerns. He is interested in the shift that happens when we realize that what we look at has become something very different from its initial appearance. He is obsessed with analyzing the space between the original impulse and its physical materialization. It’s a linear process, a timeless transformation that takes place from my brain to his mouth, from a memory to a photograph, from a negative to a piece of paper. The results are shreds he obstinately tries to combine together in order to find the true picture he once had in his head. It is a utopian goal to achieve, a path that inevitably leads to failure.

He believes in science and in the specificity of materials. He prints the same image on different kinds of paper, using different printers in order to highlight the change in our perception and fruition of them. The variation of the support corresponds to the inconsistency of memory and its role in the construction of our own inclinations. By analyzing both the palpable and intangible grain of the negative he leds to find the connection between physicality and the innate process of remembering and forgetting. The result is a rhythm made by the interchanging of positive and negative spaces, in which the sequences of remembrances and repressions are hidden. Seriality and repetition are at the root of my work, which he often sees as a swing in a regular movement between revealing and obscuring.



















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“Photofit of an Elusive Infidel” (extract)

“Hypothesis: the works of Édouard Levé exhale/exalt the disturbing effect of a disappearance. A surreal atmosphere probing enigmatic absences. In Notes on the Cinematographer, Robert Bresson enjoined himself to “Apply myself to insignificant (non-significant) images” (1975). Common sense. Logic. Like the most uncertain openings. The doorway to a great desert, a long night or an endless journey. We need only recall certain images to feel their powerful siphon effect. An effect of suction. A kaleidoscope mechanism. Lying down on a sofa and remembering Levé’s images, his studio compositions and his daytime outdoor photos is a bit like closing your eyes, or boarding the train of your own fantasies and watching the scenery fly by. At other times one has the impression one is entering a maze. That is an effect of the serial images, and of the series of images. Their titles are: Angoisse, Amérique, Pornographie, Quotidien, Rêves reconstitués, Rugby, Actualités, Fictions, Homonymes, Transferts. Of course, we will never find out what it was that was eclipsed, for these are works without a punch line, happy ending or any other kind of salutary and reassuring revelation. What or who has departed here, other than the meaning? Is it a person, an object, a feeling or only a form of power? The artist’s power. The artist’s power in relation to the dull, incessant noise of the media. The great reservoir of images. Silos, vats, abysses. The artist no longer controls the making of images. However, he does still control the differentiation of reading, deconstruction and laceration. Making media fragments disappear. Covering them with saliva or juice. Assimilating them to another body. Dissolving textures and combinations. Swallowing up spatio-temporal indicators. Spewing original arrangements. It is the great metabolism of contemporary artistic activity”.

Emile Soulier
Excerpt from “Text(e)s, Loevenbruck editions, Paris, 2009










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Todd Fisher has been around since early on, taking funny, weird, sometimes poignant pictures of people (and sometimes animals) doing things. We haven’t heard from him in a long time, but we’re glad he’s back in our collective lives. He sent us some new pictures, which you can see above. The beach ones make us miss the summer, and the others make us love the winter. Check more of his work out here.

(Source Vice – Written by: Christian Storm)









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Starting in the mid-1990s, Joachim Koester (born 1962 in Copenhagen, lives and works in Copenhagen and New York) developed an oeuvre that could be described as a complex web in which journalistic and historical research fuses with personal and fictive narratives. He belongs to an artists’ generation whose practices are based on what Hal Foster once described as the “archival approach.” Balancing the thin line between documentary and fiction, Koester’s films, photos, and installations reexamine and activate forgotten histories, failed utopias, and the obsolete. In his work, bygone counter-cultural movements reemerge in the same way that geographical and spiritual journeys are retraced.








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Working with a common 35mm point-and-shoot camera, Melissa Catanese makes photographs that are not so much about the everyday objects and events in front of her lens as how using a camera structures the photographer’s interaction with those things. The uneven illumination of a harsh flash at night, for instance, aptly demonstrates the photograph as a particular type of response, the record of a reaction. Catanese makes the pictures as personal documents, and they retain a sense of casual discovery. Drawing on the vernacular of snapshots, there is something understandably familiar in her pictures of a dog with redeye or sunlight filtered through tree branches, a familiarity that underscores the curious fact that certain things continually compel us to make pictures of them.

Melissa Catanese was born in Cleveland, Ohio. She holds a BFA from Columbus College of Art and Design (2001) and an MFAfrom Cranbrook Academy of Art (2006). Exhibitions featuring her pictures include RaiseUp2 (at C. Emmerson Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, FL; ADM Gallery, Los Angeles; and Omy Gallery, Toronto); Keep it in the Family, En Rounte, Relics, and Cul de Sac(all at Forum Gallery, Bloomfield Hills, MI); and Interface (at the Cleveland Institute of Art). Her work has been published in tiny vices, From Here on Out, RaiseUp Volumes I and 2, and as the monograph Stardust.



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Akzidenz currently living and working between Düsseldorf, Paris and Zürich. His education focused around art and communication studies in Paris and New York, where he lived and worked for many years before returning to Paris. He presently works as an art director for some of the mosthigh-end luxury brands worldwide.

Akzidenz was never professionally trained as a photographer; he is an art director and a designer. This background has a rooted presence in his work – in that is he is less interested in the representational qualities of the photograph, focusing more on the exploration of the fringes of each terrain. This focus stems from the will to not use photography as a traditional means of representation of reality but creating a platform for discourse and thought. In order to achieve this dais, he tries to invent his own visual language, using multi-exposures, superposition, juxtaposition and ‘sequentiality’ to interpret, rewrite.









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Jacinta is a freelance photographer from Melbourne, Australia. She has a cute puppy and, sometimes, a cat too. She likes to take photographs & cook & garden & make things & travel & talk about dogs so she guesses that’s probably what her portfolio is about.









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Born in Fort Worth, TX, Delaney Allen received his MFA from the Pacific Northwest College of Art in 2010. His photographs have been shown nationally and internationally, most notably at Foam Museum in Amsterdam, NL. Additionally, he has published two books, one of which was included in Photo-Eye Magazine’s “Best Of” list for 2010 (Between Here And There). Allen currently lives and works out of Portland, Ore.









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Myr Muratet was born in Paris. His work involves cities, both those he lives in and those he visits, and he carries it out from within their very sinews. The comings and goings in the places that he observes multiply according to his encounters with the people he photographs. This work has been under way for several years and has no determinate duration; in this way, he has created Paris-Nord, a series of photographs begun in 2003, about the people who use the Gare du Nord and about the mechanisms put in place to coerce and contain them.
The series that he has already begun overlap one other and together constitute a kind of addendum to the topology of the forms and mechanisms that are adopted by the agents of the processes, processors and other procedures that are involved. Without interrupting these series, Myr Muratet has shown more recently in WASTELAND the results of hugely destructive policies and the work of “sanitation professionals” under the boot of the petty bosses of the “Administration of containment.” In this work in progress, he investigates the notions of occupation and invasion in the abandoned urban areas of Seine-Saint-Denis. One might say that it is a way to make a fixed photographic representation of a systematic concatenation of methods of counterinsurgency, and then to go beyond it. The intersection of these different series reveals the stakes of domination and abuse exercised by all powers, be they digital, economic, or aesthetic. A paltry gesture perhaps, but NONETHELESS effective, at least as a lament and clearing of the accounts for these wounded spaces and the people who inhabit them: Cantos de mala compensación.
Myr Muratet, a 21st-century Vorticist, exposes you to it.

Vacant Lot para Una Pietà Burlada

Manuel Joseph









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Margaret Durow is a young photographer based in Wisconsin.

She is inspired by connections, the way now is made of everything that has come before, constantly changing and continuing. She is inspired by the way small moments and capturing light can express this. She wants to preserve this feeling, of everything being so meaningless yet equally important – always changing and ending, yet renewing/cycling, and everlasting.

She needs to take photos so she can look back at them later and remember how she felt. She usually spends her free time by herself or with close friends and family. Her experiences are often intimate, and fill her with nostalgia. She shares her photos because she wants to share this experience of looking at a photo from the past and feeling the way she did when she took it. She hopes she can express to others how she felts, and makes them feel it too.









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